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83 Comments

  1. Jan Norrish , says:

    G’day Judy, my comment is not intended as criticism – merely curiosity.
    I am not in the habit of purchasing childrens’ books a) because I only have a cat and b) I don’t particularly like children. However, I recently weakened and purchased several of your books including “Where is the Green Sheep’ for the child of a work colleague. I doubt the colleague has recovered from the shock but he will, we humans are extremely resilient.
    However, I digress:: I know we’re supposed to be politically correct but, to paraphrase your book, ‘where is the black sheep’? Black sheep do exist so the term cannot be considered racist – a sadly overused word these days. So why no black, or white, sheep?? Colour is a wonderful thing, although there you go again – many people may disagree. No pleasing everyone is there? :)
    By the way, I like your Spam filter. Very original.

    Regards, Jan (and Dubhghall the cat)

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Hi Jan, how wonderful that it was my books that tempted you into uncharted territory of children’s books. They are great things, but it is true that cats generally aren’t interested. Regarding your question, when Mem and I were picking the sheep for the book, we had lots to chose from – there are a lot of single syllable words in the world. So not everything could get in. We weren’t trying to be politically correct in leaving out the black one. It was a consideration for me that in my drawing style – black outline with the colour inside, a black sheep would be hard to show, the curls of its wool and its outline and facial features would all disappear. That’s why I mostly went for a muddy white for all the sheep that aren’t an actual colour. We avoided naming either a white sheep or a black sheep – because all the sheep in the book (apart from the ones with an actual colour) would have then had to be white or black, AS WELL AS something else (up down, moon star etc) which would confuse the naming of them. Possibly also there weren’t any appealing rhymes for ‘black’ or for ‘white’ that also had opposing pairs or synonyms, and the adjectives black and white don’t suggest any particular kind of behaviour either – blue and red was enough for me. Hope that explains it! Glad to know you read the book before you gave it away. Best wishes to you and to Dughghall.

      Reply
  2. Stef Rozitis , says:

    Hi Ms Horacek,

    I have liked your work for a long time (the first one I bought was called “If the fruit fits” but I worked at the Wilderness Society Shop so I looked at all the tshirts and cards and teatowels and things and read your books when it was a quiet moment)

    My children grew up and loved that book too (of course they liked Where is the Green Sheep when they were small and the pictures are beautiful but I think we all got even more out of the cartoons). I recently read The Story of Growl at work (childcare) and I loved it. But really I sometimes like someone’s work and don’t necessarily bother to contact them but when you promoted Eaten Fish and pointed out that noone should be incarcerated on Manus whether they are a cartoonist or not I thought I would let you know that your work is appreciated. Not just because of the quirky humour and the life in your drawings (though I like those) but because of the content.

    And that goes back a while with me…

    Anyway you are already successful so I guess you don’t need the encouragement. But here is some anyway :) Stef

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Thanks Stef, what a lovely message to receive, it is definitely nice to be appreciated, and encouragement is always very welcome. Sometimes getting work published is like dropping it into a big ocean, and you’re never sure if anyone notices or not. Great to hear that you and your children enjoyed my work together – I love it when kids are into cartooning. Warm wishes to you and your family, best, Judy

      Reply
  3. Chris , says:

    Hi Judy,

    I’m a new parent this year, and my now 8 month old really enjoys ‘Where is the Green Sheep’ – as do I!

    I have one question about the book that the Internet can’t seem to answer for me:

    On the next-to-last illustrated page, the one of a hillside with many different sheep, is there an unwritten rhyme to connect them all?

    I’ve tried to do it myself, but I can’t quite seem to get it right. What I’ve got so far:

    Here is the bike sheep (bike)/ And here is the run sheep (running down the hill)
    Here is the work sheep (or dull sheep, the briefcase & tie) / And here is the fun sheep (fruit on head)

    Here are the tea sheep (teacups) / And here are the cake sheep (cake)
    Here are the sand sheep (sandpit) / And here is the lake sheep (snorkel)

    Here is the laugh sheep (hands clasped, open mouth) / And here is the cry sheep (tears)
    Here is the vain sheep (reflection) / And here is the shy sheep (bag on head with flowers)

    I’m pretty sure that ‘boat sheep’ and ‘float sheep’ are in the final four, but I can’t work out the sheep with wings or the sheep in a pyramid. Rather than drive myself (and my partner) crazy any longer, I thought I’d ask.

    Thanks,

    Chris

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Hi Chris, No there isn’t an unwritten rhyme to all those sheep, but I am very impressed with your attempt to find one. Not only the rhymes but the connected pairs too, excellent work. The sheep with the wings would be the ‘wing sheep’ I suppose, and the ones in the pyramid perhaps could be gym sheep, and that almost rhymes. That page is composed of some sheep left over from all the initial candidates for the book, and sheep where I completely broke loose from the single syllable descriptions – The one you call the shy sheep is actually based on an Australian bushranger, only with flowers instead of a gun, he’s the Ned Kelly sheep. The one with the fruit on her head is the Carmen Miranda sheep (a movie star of old). From what I’ve heard, people make up various different names for all those sheep, some even make them all family members. Glad your 8 month old enjoys the book – happy reading and looking!

      Reply
  4. Caroline , says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed hearing you and Mem Fox speak at the Chermside library this evening. I particularly enjoyed hearing Mem speak about how you like to keep the night sky theme going between books, so was delighted to come home and read “This and That” to my children, and have my 2yo son point happily to the night sky page and say “Look Mum!”. When I asked what he was pointing to he sang “star light, star bright”…. you’re speaking to all ages. Thanks for being such a big part of my children’s love of books and reading.

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      That’s a lovely story Caroline, thanks for writing it. I’m very happy to be a part of your children’s love of books and reading – it’s wonderful to hear that my pictures are doing what they are meant to do. Long may their love continue! Regards, Judy

      Reply
  5. Francia , says:

    Welcome back!

    Have missed your lovely cartoons!
    Regards
    Francia

    Reply
  6. Henry Porter , says:

    Hi Judy,
    Finally got it and love the new edition of “I Am Woman Hear Me Draw”!
    Just wondering: was the chapter title “It’s a Beautiful World” named after the Colin Hay song or another one?
    Cheers & happy 2014,
    HP

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      I probably shouldn’t say this, but actually it was meant to be Louis Armstrong’s It’s a wonderful world. We didn’t notice that somewhere along the line it got mixed up, how funny. So perhaps now it’s Colin Hays’ song by default.

      Reply
  7. Alaska , says:

    hello judy, i love your work and your cartoons are hilarious!! i was just wondering out of curiosity how you started out as i love the idea of having a career as a political cartoonist :) also, im in high school (year 10 student) and i thought of a great idea for work experience, would it be possible if you would like to mentor me or collaborate for work experience ? the thing i love about cartooning is that you can communicate so many social,political and humourous things that the public may not be fully aware of ie. womans libertion-it’s not the stone age or medievil suppression age anymore. The cartoons i like to do are usually about housework, school and day to day sarcastic humour :) anyway, it would be lovely to hear from you and it would be a dream come true!! love from alaska xx

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Hi Alaska, sorry for this late reply. Very glad to hear you enjoy cartooning so much, sounds like you are having great fun with it. The life around you is such a great topic. Unfortunately I’m not really in a position to offer anyone a work experience position – a lot of my work is very boring admin, and the rest I need quiet and time staring out the window to do. As far as a career as a political cartoonist, it’s not the industry it once was – there are fewer and fewer jobs for cartoonists as the newspapers aren’t so popular. I hope some online opportunities might spring up, but while there are publishing opportunities online, as yet there isn’t much of a way of making a living. I think this is why I have avoided writing to you – my pessimism about the whole thing. That said, drawing cartoons is a wonderful thing to do, and if you think laterally, I’m sure there will always be ways to make it work. That’s the way I’ve done it. Wishing you much luck and all the best in your work. Warm wishes, Judy

      Reply
  8. Siubhan Macdonald , says:

    I had a post card cartoon from about twenty years ago that was of a woman with a bag and a comb facing off against an arena full of gladiators. I think the caption was “woman v’s the system”. I have searched for this cartoon but haven’t been able to find it again. I was wondering if it was one of yours and if so whether there are copies I could buy? It still remains one of my favourite cartoons and a touchstone for when things get a bit tough.

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      It isn’t one of mine, and it isn’t even one I’ve ever seen. Maybe check out the work of English cartoonist Angela Martin, she has great work and could perhaps have done something along those lines. Even if you don’t find that actual cartoon, I’m sure you’ll have fun looking at her other work.

      Reply
  9. Deborah Absler , says:

    Hi Judy

    In these very challenging days I am looking forward to seeing your response to what has happened with the leadership challenge – because if anyone can make sense of this for us – you can,

    warm regards
    Deborah

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      HI Deborah,

      Thanks for your vote of confidence! I’m not sure how much sense I can make of it, but I’ll definitely be trying to come up with something – somewhere, somehow. Such extraordinary times. Warm wishes,
      Judy

      Reply
  10. Vanessa , says:

    Hi Judy,

    Yellow has been my favourite colour for as long as I can remember so I was very excited when I found your book in the library. My 6 month old son loves it but I have tried multiple bookstores and websites to buy one with no success! Please where can I get a copy?

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Hi Vanessa, Sadly, ‘Yellow is my favourite colour’ is out of print and I have no spare copies left, after a number of requests like this. I’m trying to get someone to do a new version, so keep your fingers crossed. Any new book news is always announced in my newsletter, sign up if you’d like to be among the first to know. Very glad you love yellow – it’s been my favourite forever too – how could it not be?

      Reply
  11. Jo Crawford , says:

    Have just seen the wonderful ‘Sheila Bond 007 – Feminist Agent’ card for VWT – and how fabulous to know that you are cartooning for them. I have a 13 year old daughter who is currently completely passionate about James Bond (and is writing some stories starring a young female secret agent protagonist called Jane Bond) – but thinks her mother’s work on gender is pretty boring. Would love to change her mind with a limited edition print of the Bond cartoon – anything planned?

    Reply
    • judy horacek , says:

      Hi Jo, how funny about your daughter’s reaction to your work, but I guess it was always thus with parents and children. Obviously you’ve had an affect on her spirit. No plans to do a limited edition print of this cartoon – it’s something that’s pretty difficult to organise and (sadly) I don’t think there’d be enough of a market for them. But you could always print out the pic from Sheilas and show her that way. The gig at Sheilas is great, I’m having such fun. Best, Judy

      Reply

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